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Travel Success (& Horror) Stories


    • Harmb
      Participant
      Harmb

      Guys! I went to Toronto to visit Canada’s wonderland (woohoo) but what often comes along with travelling is that responsibility of finding a restaurant…. I’ve never been to Moxie’s before, but it has a lot of options on the online menu. It said at the top “gluten free options available” so here I am, thinking, ” oh! This is perfect”. So off my boyfriend and I go to Moxie’s. And just to double check before sitting down, I ask the waitress, ” and I just want to double check that you do have gluten free options” the waitress looks at me, leaves and then come back. And this is what she said “well, we don’t have Gluten FREE options. But we do have Gluten FRIENDLY options.” -ya I know what you’re thinking. WTH is that? – so I look at her, very confused and said ” what does that mean?” And she starts to laugh and says “well, we don’t have gluten free options but we have gluten FRIENDLY options” (meaning they had gluten free substitutions for pastas and such but didn’t actually make the rest of the meal that came along with it ( such as the sauce WITH the pasta) Gluten free. Honestly guys. I don’t even know why that term found a way to come to life but it royally ticks me off.


    • CanadianCeliac
      Participant
      CanadianCeliac

      I’m surprised at Moxie’s, as they have an excellent reputation for accommodating food allergies and celiac, as there’s food allergies in the owner’s family. Did you speak with a manager by any chance? I wonder if the server was confused, because I know some restaurant chains here have had to change the term gluten free to gluten friendly because the GF food is prepared in the same kitchen as food containing gluten.

      Sorry about your experience, Toronto is normally an excellent city for safe GF!


    • Snowflakes
      Participant
      Snowflakes

      I hate that term also. I am voting for a new one “Celiac safe”.

      “Gluten Friendly” means they are friendly to the gluten. To be “gluten free”, they have to be “gluten hostile”! LOL

      I don’t call my TREATMENT a “diet” anymore.

      It does not seem to matter how expensive the restaurant is either. We went to a high priced fancy reservations only one in Savannah, GA. I ordered from the gluten free menu. The waiter says, “Of course, I’ll have to leave off the sauce for that meat because it has wheat.” They put down a boiled steak that was tasteless.


    • Treena
      Participant
      Treena

      I too am surprised to hear what happened at a Moxie’s. Whenever we go out to eat at Moxie’s in Regina (SK) I advise our waiter/waitress that I am Celiac (and Lactose Intolerant) and have always been told that the Manager will come and speak to me. They have always been reassuring and helpful and the manager has always been the one to bring my meal out. I have never once been sick after eating there.


    • CanadianCeliac
      Participant
      CanadianCeliac

      Treena, what’s Regina like for GF options/awareness? Also, do you find any issues with airborne pollen at wheat harvest time, or do you just avoid heading into the country at that time?


    • nonstandardtoaster
      Participant
      nonstandardtoaster

      The Moxie’s in Kelowna puts on a good show with the manager saying all the right things and handling food “personally”, but when my son-in-law worked in that kitchen he said the kitchen staff was clueless, and he just couldn’t stay on top of it all himself. They eventually just put him on salads so they wouldn’t have to listen to him.
      He says that’s typical for restaurants he’s worked at here.
      I find that’s true. I rarely have a meal out here without getting sick, but when I travel to other towns I have better experiences.
      Come to Kelowna for the wine. Skip the food.


    • CanadianCeliac
      Participant
      CanadianCeliac

      Sorry to hear that. Kelowna is beautiful, probably won’t be going back anytime soon though because of what you described. And I’m deathly allergic to wine, so I can’t even drown my sorrows – nothing but 100% agave tequila and potato vodka for me! Generally for travelling or living even, I find it helps to be in a very large city, if 95% of places are out, nice for that 5% to still be enough for options!

      I’ve actually heard similar things about Vancouver, which surprised me. I’ve come across a couple of people who eat out all the time around here, but got sick when they went to Vancouver. The explanation I’ve heard, GF is so common there, the kitchen staff just doesn’t take extra precautions since most people ordering GF aren’t celiac or gluten intolerant.


      • nonstandardtoaster
        Participant
        nonstandardtoaster

        Yeah, that’s pretty accurate. 10 years ago when nobody knew what gluten was, I had no problems. Different story now.


      • Margie C
        Participant
        Margie C

        I live in Vancouver and it’s really about knowing where to eat. If you want to eat gluten free and be assured that the cross contamination isn’t going to be an issue, be prepared to pay more and to pre-plan. I avoid fast food (other than sushi – and even then only in select locations) and mid-range restaurants (Earls, Cactus Club, Moxies) due to the same issues as noted by many in this thread with little care going into prep. I have however had fantastic luck with higher end restaurants. I eat on a regular basis at Joe Fortes and many of the restaurants by the Glowbal group (one of the owners’ grandkids have celiac) and I’ve been well taken care of, with no cross contamination issues. Places like Hawksworth, if you’re looking for a fancy night out, can make accommodations for celiac and allergies, with some notice (they can do it on the fly but I have had better luck when they have received a heads up a few days in advance) which includes working out substitutions for sauces and such – instead of just leaving it out. The fact that most of these kitchens are scratch kitchens (little to no pre-packaged food) and that they keep them immaculate (I would eat off the floor in Hawksworth it’s that clean) make a difference.


        • dania
          Participant
          dania

          I live on Vancouver too Margie C and I was just wondering out of curiosity which sushi places you feel comfortable going to?

    • lcgraham
      lcgraham
      Participant
      lcgrahamlcgraham

      I’m afraid this is fairly common in the restaurant industry. The restaurant/store/shop could makes claims to be gluten friendly/free, but in reality, the kitchen and wait staff mostly likely have no clue as to what you are talking about, unless the owner/operator themselves is actually CD/GF as well. Having a high staff turn over presents a lot of problems.

      I was able to develop a relationship with a particular restaurant in my neighborhood that wasn’t exactly GFree, but was GFriendly and went out of their way to accommodate me, up to the point that the wait staff didn’t have to take my order anymore, the chef came out from the kitchen and asked me what she could prepare for me that day (in reality, I was really fond of her and she likewise). Not until they had a huge and frequent turn over in staff (including my lady friend) that service had tanked and could not get the orders right. Frequently, I returned the items to the kitchen, but too often came back with the same or a different problem.


    • rushu02
      Participant
      rushu02

      PORTLAND OREGON . I live here and there are so many options for us to eat…15 different pizza brands including domino’s and Papa Murphy’s. We have many different restaurants and stores that carry gluten free at a reasonable price.


    • amani_al-zubi
      Participant
      amani_al-zubi

      I’ll let you know that is not what glutten friendly is at all. As a waitress, glutten friendly at the classical italian restuarent i work at simply means that yes we offer glutten free pizza and pasta, but the pasta is often cooked in the same water and the pizza is baked in the same oven. Sure if its not busy we can put a sheat in the pizza oven or empty the water and replace it for the glutten friendly pasta. But even then we can never, ever guarantee cross contamination. We use the term glutten friendly so people are aware we cant guarantee it to have no contact with our glutten food and are not held responsible if a celiac decides to take that risk.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 3 months ago by amani_al-zubi.
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