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13 Comments

  1. 1

    Melissa

    Here, here! I also often wonder, as you said, “Why do you CARE what I eat”? It’s maddening.

    Reply
  2. 2

    Clarissa Parry

    Thank you for all your articles they are excellent! I to have celiac disease and ended up opening a GlutenZeroBakery, in Las Vegas, Nevada. I share all your articles on my Facebook/GlutenZeroBakery.

    Thank you, Clarissa

    Reply
  3. 3

    Sharon

    Thank you for all you do to support the celiac community!

    Reply
  4. 4

    Connie

    There’s also been a resurgence of food bullying with Peter Rabbit the movie as well.

    Bullying sucks. Food bullying can kill.

    Reply
  5. 5

    Jeannie Bedra

    I’ll tell you the answer and it’s not pretty. Big Food industry sees the hand writing on the wall. More and more people are beginning to see the problems with wheat and other foods and their health. There’s a great documentary on Netflix called “What’s With Wheat.” Check it out. The Big Food industry is afraid people will change their diets to real food. Another case of following the money!

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Angelica

      I agree with this. I think we’re stuck in a state of not wanting to admit we chose a toxic plant as a staple food and fueled an entire industry on it.

      But I think the real weakness would be if we weren’t ingenious enough to make a clean break with toxic foods. Surely if science is such a panacea, it contains the answer to how to live without wheat?

      Reply
  6. 6

    Christine

    Hi Gluten Dude,
    Little off topic but I often search celiac news and just read article 8th Grader’s Celiac Warning :Gluten in Cheerios. By Micheal Jacobs. Thought you might enjoy reading it.

    Reply
  7. 7

    Angelica

    100% agreement. What I found to be really sick about bullying, in middle and high school, once we had a fight, the bully often tried to become my friend. It made me want to hurl. I took one girl up on it. She showed me her horse (she lived on a farm I guess), and insisted I ride it without any experience. The horse tried to buck me and she laughed. I only thank my genetics that I instinctively hung on and wasn’t injured.

    And you’re on the money about schools too. OK, this was a long time ago in the 80s, but the teachers were totally hands off about it. Fighting meant you both got suspended, creating a false equivalence. One day a girl I didn’t even know picked a fight with me during lunch and only I got suspended because I guess I was the problem one who was always being bullied. I missed a week of lacrosse practice. To this day, I never even found out the other girl’s name.

    I’m a TCK, a third culture kid, I had an accent for most of that time. While my teachers are teaching me in social studies about diversity and the American melting pot, I’m being pounded at lunch time. Somehow I managed to value diversity anyway, but it’s a miracle.

    It might not be politically correct, but when people I know ask me about it, I tell them to tell their kids to fight back. Avoiding a fight doesn’t work and who gets in trouble is random anyway. Being viewed as tough-enough is sadly more important. I rationalize that, the same way I rationalize the fact that, I have to eat meat to be healthy. I was once a vegan/vegetarian. Yeah I feel guilty now, but I didn’t ask God to make life like this. I can only try to live the best life I can. More bullying in the vegan community about that too… can’t leave paradise.. it’s not done.

    Reply
  8. 8

    Sara

    Have you seen the new Kevin James comedy special on a Netflix? Ooof.

    Reply
    1. 8.1

      Cathy LB

      I read a review. He called us “gluten douches”. So no, I don’t think I will watch it.
      Maybe you should let him and Netflix know what you thought about it.

      Reply
  9. 9

    Ari

    I don’t know about the East Coast, but in the West, it’s especially bad. People from LA and Hollywood are the biggest appropriators of the gluten-free diet and also its biggest detractors. Where I live, we have a large number of transplants from southern California and they are the most openly caustic toward celiacs and the GFD. Most people who are native to my city, from the East Coast, or the South either don’t know what gluten free is or don’t honestly care what celiacs eat. Part of it is simply ignorance. Part of it is, however, an opportunity to scapegoat someone else. We’re an easy target, as most of the medical field and society at large believes that we’re hypochondriacs. Thus, we “deserve to be picked on.” The only thing that I believe will stop this crap will be a celiac comic or someone with coglioni to start ridiculing Hollywoodites and other richie-rich SoCal-ites as being the narcissistic pricks that they are.

    Reply
  10. 10

    Chris Meaney

    My standard response to the food bullies is: “I tell you what, I’ll lock you and me in a room and I’ll eat some gluten and let’s see if you still think I’m making this up later!!”. That usually shuts them up! :-)

    Reply
  11. 11

    R.C.

    Apparently we can’t stop it. But it doesn’t matter. We can handle it… because we’re Superman. From my perspective – gluten is like kryptonite – it gives humans energy and capabilities, but from us it takes it away and can kill us in a large enough amount. And malabsorption and malnutrition – they’re like Lex Luthor and Brainiac – they can take the toughest and healthiest out there and make them turn weak and sick in no time. People don’t feel threatened by them because most never had to face them, while we fight the two every day. Since we look like Clark Kent to people, no wonder they throw gluten at as, and at times even behind our back. And as we get weakened when exposed to gluten, we’re nothing short of Kal-El. And on planet Earth this means – we’re Superman. Fallon, Behar, Kotb, Jones and the likes stand no chance against us without gluten by their side – because they’re just human sidekicks to our true enemies. Whoever has a gluten related disorder is like Superman. Of course, leave it to people to consider themselves to be Super-anything, but only a selected few lead the lifestyle that goes along with it. It’s hard being Superman. It’s hard being parents to Superman, it’s hard being partners, family, friends and supporters to Superman – but that just means you’re either a very decent, good, beautiful and smart person or a member of the JLA. There. I rest my case.

    Reply

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