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31 Comments

  1. 1

    Catherine N.

    Thanks Dude! Commented and signed.

    Reply
  2. 2

    Shannon

    I’ve signed the petition and written about this as well. It drives me crazy and perpetuates the gluten free myths! There is NO process that makes gluten safe!
    Reading through the law is maddening as it contradicts itself in several places and leaves the door open for interpretation to companies out to jump on the gf bandwagon and rake in the money from the gf fad!
    Thanks for your informative post about the problems with gluten free labeling!

    Reply
  3. 3

    Amanda

    I also signed the petition, and left a comment. I am new to having Celiac. (2 years) And I learn something new everyday about it. Thanks for sharing this info.

    Reply
  4. 4

    Cathi

    My husband bought this product after seeing the product showcased on Shark Tank. We received the product and thank goodness I thought to myself- hmm teriyaki- how did they do that gluten free and looked at the label. I too contacted the company and got a similar response. I followed up with the ironic fact that the Soy Vay company (according to the Soy Vay website) has a gluten free teriyaki product that would be more suited to their gluten free claims. I received no comment to this.

    Reply
  5. 5

    Netti Zurawski

    I’m trying to submit – but the little box before “I read and understand the statement above” won’t let me check it. I’ve gone back into Edit mode and come back out. I’ll try to re-do the whole thing. Frustrating :(

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Netti Zurawski

      OK – After not being able to even access the site for about 5 minutes, I was able to get in and submit my comments. Thanks for bringing this to our attention!

      Reply
  6. 6

    Deb

    The page is still loading … I am hoping that is because it is so overwhelmed with people trying to make comments that it cannot load at this time. I will keep trying. Perhaps the FDA needs to be informed about Lorraine, the woman who died at the age of 46 after a long battle with Celiac Disease. I am sick and tired of the fad dieters making life a living hell. Hardly anyone takes this disease seriously. I just returned from a 3 day trip where I ate almost nothing (I could handle the 3 pound weight loss, but I sure felt a lot of hunger pangs) while everyone else enjoyed their meals together. I tried to find safe places to eat but, after being told several times, that, YES, we have gluten free food but NO we do not prep it in it’s own area, I pretty much accepted that I was just going to be eating my Gluten Free Bars and my trail mix … and lots of water … on this trip. Story of my life after my Celiac diagnosis … but, at least I still have a life. Can’t say that of Lorraine … rest her soul. Thank you for sharing the info about the petition. It is hard enough to live with this disease without the food manufacturers being given ways out of having to provide a 100% truthful label which would guarantee we can safely eat the freaking food. There are still too many loopholes to be able to rely on the words “gluten free” on a product. My granddaughter works at a pizza place which makes “gluten free” pizza. She got in trouble for telling a customer that there was cross-contamination because her doing so lost a sale. Restaurants are merely “encouraged” to comply with guidelines, so we are totally at the mercy of people who are, for the most part, in the dark about this potentially killer disease … or who just don’t care.

    Reply
    1. 6.1

      Jeanne

      Yes, Deb. I feel the same as you do, and have definitely had vacations where I heavily relied on my trusty suitcase of safe food. I also get so sick and tired of the fad. It seems to be fading out a little now where I live (the northeast) and I’m hoping that’s true. I mostly don’t eat pre-processed food. I mostly just eat food that already is GF and yes, for sure, I cook it myself. And the people who don’t care, or who say mean things to us……..well, we’ll just try to keep away from them, won’t we?

      Reply
  7. 7

    Marion Kirkham

    Are Canadians allowed to comment on the Citizen Petition?

    Reply
    1. 7.1

      Gluten Dude

      That I do know but my assumption would be no…

      Reply
    2. 7.2

      Cathy LB

      Marion, under category check off “international public citizen”. That should work.

      Reply
  8. 8

    Nancy

    Thank you for sharing Gluten Free Watchdog’s petition on this subject. My entire family, extended family, and friends signed and commented on the petition even though my son is the only family member with Celiac Disease. Everyone wanted to support my son in addition to the strong belief that product deception is just plain wrong. Please encourage your families and friends to sign/comment on the petition. There is strength in numbers. . .

    Reply
  9. 9

    Kathy McAuliffe

    Commented and signed!

    Reply
  10. 10

    Susan

    OK Dude,
    Nice catch.
    The FDA addresses fermentation and the bogus claims that it changes the gluten in any way.

    [i]“9. What additional requirements does FDA propose to verify a “gluten-free” claim on hydrolyzed or fermented foods?
    Because the current gluten tests do not adequately detect and quantify gluten in fermented and hydrolyzed foods or ingredients, FDA proposes that, in order to make a “gluten-free” claim, manufacturers of these foods would have to make and keep records to show all of the following:
    • The food meets the definition for “gluten-free” in 21 CFR 101.91(a)(3), including that the food had less than 20 ppm gluten, before fermentation or hydrolysis.
    • The manufacturer adequately evaluated the processing for any potential for gluten cross-contact.
    • Where a potential for gluten cross-contact has been identified, the manufacturer has implemented measures to prevent the introduction of gluten into the food during the manufacturing process.
    These records could include test results conducted by the manufacturer or an ingredient supplier, a certificate of analysis, or other appropriate verification documentation for the food or each ingredient used in the foods.“[/i]

    https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Allergens/ucm472735.htm

    The claim:
    [i]“During the fermenting process, as the jerky is cured and cooked down, the defatted wheat germ that is used becomes so minimal that it is well below the percentage to even be considered a gluten product.”[/i]
    Is a clear violation of the law. They are required to test for gluten content BEFORE any fermentation process.

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      Gluten Dude

      Nicely done…thanks for catching that.

      Reply
    2. 10.2

      Dee

      Susan, thank you!

      Reply
  11. 11

    Kat

    I feel like they can keep their 20ppm for gluten free (for the fad dieters) and should add a new label called “Celiac Safe” which contains 0 zero gluten.

    Reply
    1. 11.1

      Gluten Dude

      To be fair, there is no test for zero gluten. I think the best they can test for is either 3ppm or 5ppm. And studies have shown that the celiac body can tolerate 20ppm (which is still a very minute amount.) I understand your point…just don’t want to mislead anyone.

      Reply
      1. 11.1.1

        Kat

        This Celiac body can’t tolerate any Gluten at all. By Celiac Safe, I mean they cannot contain a single gluten containing ingredient. I feel like trying to find food I can eat is a free for all. So I cook everything from scratch. It’s the only way to guarantee my health.

        Reply
        1. 11.1.1.1

          Jeanne

          On my way out, Dude. I’ll go and sign the petition in the morning. Thanks, as usual, for all you do for our community. jeanne

          Reply
        2. 11.1.1.2

          Jeanne

          Same here, Kat. That’s also how I take care of this celiac body!

          Reply
        3. 11.1.1.3

          Dee

          I cook from scratch most of the time as well. It is healthier, and imo, yummier ;)

          Reply
  12. 12

    Jeanne

    On my way out, Dude. I’ll go and sign the petition in the morning. Thanks, as usual, for all you do for our community. jeanne

    Reply
  13. 13

    Sybil Nassau

    From what I understand and the kind folks at Schar’s explained it to me in a long and extensive email. There IS away to take a wheat product and make it gluten free! If you look at the ingredients in a few of Schar’s products ie, the new croissants, it will list wheat starch as an ingredient. The first time I saw that, I emailed the company and they replied promptly—they use the “process of “distillation” to remove gluten from the wheat starch rendering it safe to use.” Is this the same distillation process used by the liquor industry to make whiskey from barley, rye and scotch? It is used throughout Europe to provide substance and body to gluten free baked products without a problem. I can’t help wondering if this is the same process used by Omission Beer that many celiacs drink without a problem? If anyone has further questions, I invite them to call or email Schar’s and discuss it further. However there is a vodka on the market that is also distilled from wheat- does that mean it, too, is safe?

    Reply
    1. 13.1

      Cali Celiac

      Omission beer is not distilled, it has enzymes added that are supposed to break down the gluten into it’s components leaving less than 20ppm. It also doesn’t seem to work which is why they can’t label it gluten free. In a distillation process the liquid is boiled and the condensation is collected. The gluten can’t vaporize so it remains behind which is why most whiskeys, scotches, etc. and the vodka from wheat are OK, however, a word of caution. Distillers sometimes add ingredients into the product after distillation and those can contain gluten. Example, Jameson’s Cask Mates is a new whiskey that is aged in old stout beer barrels and is not safe due to the gluten contamination in the barrels. As for wheat starch I can’t see how you can distill anything that isn’t liquid and starch is a carbohydrate made up of glucose, so seems implausible. Have to do some research on that one.

      Reply
  14. 14

    kathleen H

    commented and signed

    Reply
  15. 15

    Laura

    Signed! I’m super new to gluten free for my celiac daughter. I bought a trail mix labeled gluten free and after she had consumed I looked on back and it was made on the same line as wheat. What?!

    Reply
  16. 16

    Dick L.

    I’m confused. I thought the USDA had jurisdiction over labelling of meat products. See Tricia Thompson’s Gluten Free Dietician article “Labeling of USDA-Regulated Foods” (www.glutenfreedietitian.com/labeling-of-usda-regulated-foods). It’s also covered in a Gluten Free Watchdog article “Foods Labeled Gluten-Free Must Now be in Compliance with the FDA Gluten-Free Labeling Rule”. Section 2 of that article goes into this in detail.

    The upshot seems to be that most companies subject to USDA jurisdiction comply with the FDA rules, but it’s voluntary. (And to further twist your mind into little knots, alcoholic beverages are under another government agency’s jurisdiction.)

    As far as I know, this information is still current.

    Reply
  17. 17

    Dick L.

    Just commented and signed the petition. It’s up to 590 comments now.

    Reply
  18. 18

    Hilary Adams

    Done and thanks as usual for looking out for us Dude.

    Reply
  19. 19

    Leslie

    I just filled out the petition. Thanks for posting the link. Last week, I inadvertently purchased several items that were labeled as “gluten-free,” but actually turned out to have gluten. Thank goodness I didn’t actually eat these items.

    Reply

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