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35 Comments

  1. 1

    Lisa

    My first question is, “who are you to be writing an article on Celiac disease?”

    Are you a doctor? Did you actually research your topic before you wrote?

    Clearly you have no idea what you are talking about and this article never should have been published. Shame on you for spreading misinformation about a disease that many of us suffer from!

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      Lisa

      Ugh. Dude. I meant to leave my comment on Ms. McFarland’s article. My bad…

      Reply
      1. 1.1.2

        Betsy Long

        Go gett’em Lisa!!! :)

        Reply
    2. 1.2

      Gluten Dude

      I’m assuming you’re talking to Sharron…and not me ;)

      Reply
  2. 2

    Kara

    Yeah, that article was pretty much the most horrible thing ever. And, unfortunately, something my family would read and cling onto to use as justification for lack of support for a gluten-free diet. Ugh.

    Reply
  3. 3

    Ivan

    And yet, in spite of all the horsemanure in the middle, what she says at the end is actually fine “Thus, anyone who does not have celiac disease (so, most of the world) should think very carefully before implementing a gluten-free diet; perhaps even see a nutritionist or dietician to get more information”

    Reply
  4. 4

    Dana

    Follow the link, go to the site, click on contact us in the top left corner and ask them to take this article down. Ridiculous.

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      Dana

      I’m afraid if we make our comments in the comments section that this site will count it as a victory, upping their site stats and helping them earn advertising money for this cwap.

      Reply
  5. 5

    Kati

    I love that you called this out. As a trained reporter – who worked at several big newspapers – this is a disgrace. She should be appalled – and her editor should be fired for not fact checking and making sure the writer, of all people, fact checked. BUT I love how everyone has attacked her in the comments. HILARIOUS! Hi five Gluten Dude for bringing awareness to the article and getting everyone to comment on it. I’m still learning about Celiac and had I “stumbled” upon this article, I may have actually believed it (I’m passed that point but I may have; I know my friend who’s daughter was just diagnosed 2 weeks ago would!)

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Kati

      Make that high five, whoopsies

      Reply
  6. 6

    Sandi

    Oh, gosh yes! I read this article the other day and just cringed!

    Reply
  7. 7

    Diane

    Link is not taking me to the article so hopefully they already took it down.

    Reply
  8. 8

    Celiac and the Beast

    Bummer, already taken down! I was hoping to see it in all of its glory!

    Reply
  9. 9

    Megan

    Sad day article is down

    Reply
  10. 10

    Melissa

    I can’t believe that a so-called medical website even publishes work by someone so ignorant. I found another earlier article by this same author on the FDA guidelines for gluten-free: http://diabetesinsider.com/fda-clamps-new-labeling-standards-gluten-free-products/34626
    I am so happy to know that I only suffer from “diarrhea, bloating, abdominal pain and weight loss.” This brain fog, joint pain, fatigue, dizziness and insomnia must be in my head.

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      Diana

      As of today (2/8/2016) all the links to this article lead to 404 errors :(

      Reply
  11. 11

    Emmy

    The article has been removed……

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      Gluten Dude

      Ah…a techie after my own heart. Well done Laurie!!

      Reply
    2. 12.2

      Ken

      I spoke too soon. Thanks!

      Reply
  12. 13

    el Hefe

    I can’t think of anything nice to say. Maybe…, the article was not likely to have been plagiarized? That’s not so nice either, though.

    Hmmmm, dilemma

    Reply
  13. 14

    Anna

    I see they took the article down. Victory! A few good people CAN make a difference. As a communications professional who happens to have the “yak” I see this as a win. Thank you for putting a stop to terrible communication practices, Dude.

    Reply
    1. 14.1
  14. 15

    Ken

    I should check my email earlier. I missed the article. I wish someone got a screen shot, if only for the schadenfreude value.

    Reply
  15. 16

    Cindy

    Sure wish I could read this article but all the links are not working. Here in MI this week – a school board was discussing birthday snacks for children with allergies and an extremely ignorant and callous school board member actually said “Maybe we should just shoot them”. WHAT!!! Luckily it was all caught on tape and has been played on the news and she has resigned but it is so disheartening to think someone would make such a cruel and insensitive remark under the guise of humor. My daughter said it has gone viral.

    Reply
  16. 17

    Mary Kate

    Given that the website has no information about who they are, who their authors are, or who is looking over their “medical” information, I trust nothing at all on there. I do not trust someone who can’t tell me why I should read and listen.

    Reply
  17. 18

    Skatie

    Speaking of articles, the latest edition of Consumer Reports has an AWESOME article on gluten. They mention not only celiac disease but gluten sensitivity, and they don’t underplay the health impact so far as I can tell. I’ll try to find a link online and post it.

    Reply
  18. 19

    Musicmidget

    Wow! I’m so glad I don’t have gluten intolerane. I have no clue what intolerane is but it sounds painful!

    Reply
    1. 19.1

      DD

      It sounds like something you’d find in your garage. You know, like propane, turpentine, rustoleum…right next to the can of intolerane. Weatherproofing, maybe?

      Reply
  19. 20

    Musicmidget

    I think I’m just going to file this one under “WTF?!??!!!” And get back to my Turkey Day baking. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

    Reply
  20. 21

    Jamet

    Thanks Gluten Dude for another great post! She does not realize the damage she could do to any person newly diagnosed with Celiac. Have a Happy Thanksgiving!

    Reply
  21. 22

    msQuel

    A lot of what she is saying is accurate. I have celiac. I can go out and eat whatever I choose to! And guess how I choose to eat? Gluten free. Yes, although I can eat as much wheat, barley and rye as I want to, my desire to eat them is outweighed by my desire to have villi and a functioning intestine.

    However, comparing celiac, which has symptoms more like autoimmune illness and sometimes like GI illness, to lactose intolerance, which has only GI effects, that’s nuts. How long does the average celiac take for their diagnosis? About 20 years! 20! I was diagnosed with IBS in 1994 and celiac in 2013. That’s 19 1/2 years of a possible misdiagnosis. When I first failed my serology I was over 500x over the normal limits. When I got my endoscopy (EGD) done, I had zero villi, and flattened scallops where the villi would have been. And even longer wait after that before I could get a diagnosis until the pathology and FINALLY genetics came back.

    One scoop of ice cream, and you KNOW if you have lactose intolerance.

    While the article, which has been removed, sounds to be full of crap, I can honestly say I can eat anything I want. But I choose to be gluten free which means a LOT more than avoiding wheat, barley and rye.

    Reply

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