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13 Comments

  1. 1

    Colette Ledoux

    Great article! You’re as clear as bell when discussing such a muddled, messy subject!

    Reply
  2. 2

    Deb

    I was diagnosed in 2001 and I had an easier time then in knowing what really was gluten free. Now that the world thinks it is easy to be GF because of all the food labeled GF, and menus which say the restaurant has GF food, my life is way easier staying at home preparing food from whole food in my safe kitchen than being sociable and trying to explain why I really can’t eat the food labeled gluten free because, well, it isn’t gluten free enough. My family and friends think I am a food obsessed fruitloop and have pretty much left me off the invite list now. Thank you money makers and stock market junkies who look only at the bottom line of their portfolios while dreaming of their retirement in luxury. My time is running out. My hope is too. I have accepted that I will not see our society care about its’ people more than money before I die. As long as people with Celiac believe the labels (which they do) and the menus (which they do) and vehemently protect that belief with misinformation everywhere, things aren’t going to change any time soon.

    Reply
  3. 3

    Jane

    Great article, as always, Dude. Keep the info f lowing. We are listening.

    Reply
  4. 4

    Nikki

    “Barley” and “malting” does not provide me ANY comfort in their process. That sounds SO scary! I feel ashamed for those with celiac disease that buy into these products. So not worth it. A co-worker tried to tell me last week that I can have a corona because her friend with celiac disease drinks corona. My response? I’d love to chat with your friend about her celiac disease. Clearly has not educated herself enough about the long term consequences. Then makes the whole community look “overdramatic” when we avoid these products. Thank you for always shining a light on these issues and never holding back!

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      Dick L.

      Malting isn’t scary– it’s just the process of taking a grain, moistening it so that it starts to sprout, then toasting it to stop the growth, dry it out, and develop the flavor. When a grain sprouts, it develops enzymes that convert the starch in the grain to sugars which feed the growing plant. It’s what they do with sorghum to make the malt for gluten free beers. Malted barley– poison to us. Malted sorghum– great stuff, and the base for several brands of GF beer.

      Reply
      1. 4.1.1

        G

        What’s even better than malted sorghum is malted millet. That is the grain that produces a beer that comes closest to “real” beer. You can brew with this and not know the difference. I brew my own. But your point about clarifying what malted means is correct, as opposed to barley.

        Reply
        1. 4.1.1.1

          Dick L.

          Yeah, I was trying to keep it simple to make the point about malting not being a problem, just the grain that’s malted. Interesting to see your comment on millet. (It gives GF breads a good flavor/aroma, too.) Glutenberg says ” millet, buckwheat, corn, quinoa and amaranth are only a few examples of the grains we use on a daily basis”, although from the diagram on their website, it doesn’t look like they malt any of them. Do you know of any commercial GF beers that use malted millet?

          Reply
          1. 4.1.1.1.1

            G

            Some of the better ones do but they are not available on the east coast where I live and if they were would cost a lot more than I would pay. That is why I brew my own. Those breweries do use malted millet by Grouse malting, the same kind I use. You can order it from glutenfreehomebrew.org

            Reply
  5. 5

    HS

    I went into a pizza shop with my husband and kids this weekend and saw a note on the door that they now have “Gluten Friendly pizza.” In my mind that is a huge hint that the pizza is anything but friendly for a celiac!! I do hope that more people can become educated. This is much more than a “diet” and we can’t “cheat!” I love your articles GD, they help so much! Thanks to you I have never given in to trying (not so) “gluten free Cheerios” and I have learned so much about how to avoid cc.

    Reply
  6. 6

    Susan Felton

    Thanks Gluten Dude for a brilliant article. I appreciate all you do to keep us informed and healthy.

    Reply
  7. 7

    Nikki

    Yes companies are out to make a profit! That’s what companies do. Anyone who starts a business is out to make money, I mean why go through the headache of starting a company if you aren’t going to make money?!. You don’t start making and selling your arts and crafts out of your garage just to break even. Yes, right now it’s expensive. That is to be expected. It takes a lot to start making things truly gluten free. You literally have to build new facilities, you have to buy things from establishments that can garuntee that the product is GF, this means that no equipment can ever be used to harvest or process anything other than GF grains. Plus, with the exception of rice, corn and oats, none of the GF alternatives are mass marketed. Thus only a bare handful of grower supply them. When the demand for these crops go up, so does the price until other growers catch on and start producing them too.. then the price will start to go down. It’s not cheap or easy to churn out a GF products on a mass scale because up until recently nobody wanted it. Like Cell phones. Back in the late 80’s early 90’s cell phones and plans were $1000.00+ a month, but as they grew and the product got more competition, so now it is rare for someone not to have one. This, like technology needs time to grow, as it does, it will be more wide spread and cheaper.

    Reply
  8. 8

    Lisa

    I went for a drink yesterday and asked if they had any gluten free beer? The answer I got was “budweiser”! My response was “budweiser is not gluten free and please do not tell people it is”. Bartender continued to disagree saying it’s made with rice so it’s gluten free.. yikes!

    Reply
  9. 9

    Jersey Girl

    Miss you GD. Thought of you yesterday when i heard I’m in love with a Jersey Girl. All the best to you. You are my favorite advocate for this debilitating disease. I advocate every day-every little bit helps.

    Love,
    Jersey Girl

    “Hope is a good thing, maybe the best thing, and no good thing ever dies.”

    Reply

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