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25 Comments

  1. 1

    Donna

    I prefer hotdogs cooked in water or burned on the grill. The idiot must have told the child that it was a “different” or “special” kind of hotdog pretty much letting him know that it was going to taste like Sh*! so he thought it tasted like Sh!*!!!!!!!! Some people are sooo insensitive that it makes me want to vomit!!!!!! My mother in law does the same thing. Every Easter she makes Ricotta Cheese Pie…my favorite. So I asked her to make me one with no crust cuz everything else in the recipe is gf. What does she do? She makes me a pie that is not even a quarter of an inch thick. I had to cute 5 slices (almost the whole pie) to make a “full” slice of pie. I mean I appreciated that she made it for me…I really did, but…what the F? She will also cook a roast or a turkey in a browning bag. Those of us that use browning bags know that you have to put some flour in the bag. Mind you, I have given her a whole bag of gf flour for just such occasions. She uses regular flour and then has the cahonas to tell me that the “Flour is only on the outside. Just scrape it off”. OMG….Is it stupidity? Is it just being uncaring? I have no idea. But, I just wanted to let you know that you are NOT alone when it comes to stupidity in the family! Good luck!

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      call me anonymous today

      OMG, MY MIL does this TOO. The one year she raved about how she spent $50 on an organic GF turkey and then I walked down to the restroom, passed the kitchen and witnessed her putting white gluten flour in the bag!

      The Killer? She doesn’t even serve the whole turkey for looks! NOOOOooo we carve it up ahead of time, put the meat in a pan and then have a buffet!

      Reply
      1. 1.1.1

        The Gluten Dude

        [shaking my head]

        Reply
  2. 2

    The Atomic Mom

    We get this same kind of negative response with our son’s peanut allergy. “I don’t know what peanut is in!” Well, Mom (my mom) just read the label, that will tell you everything you need to know.

    Reply
    1. 2.1

      Skye M.

      We do as well with my son’s peanut allergy, they just aren’t in the habit of reading labels. I am visiting them next week with my newly-minted GF diagnosis, so we’ll see how it goes!

      Reply
  3. 3

    Angel

    That is so rude!! some people just disgust me!! How could they be so inconsiderate *especially* to a 6 year old. it would be a little different if it were an adult but a 6 year old!! Thats so sad!! :(

    Reply
  4. 4

    Jen M.

    You know what? I’m not even going to take stupid comments about adult celiac personally anymore. If it is in human nature for someone to be insensitive to a child about having a disease, then there probably isn’t much hope for ever enlightening segment because they’re just bad people who won’t ever get it (unless it happens to them).

    This makes me sad for this poor little guy!

    Reply
  5. 5

    Amy -The Quirky Gluten Free Runner

    We have separated ourselves from those who don’t understand. After years of trying to educate them (a little) and all, it’s just not worth our sanity or blood pressure to deal with people who are willing to just decide something is “too tough” to figure out.

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      The Gluten Dude

      That’s most likely the best route to take (sadly).

      Reply
  6. 6

    J

    This is utter bullsh*t!!!!!! I’m sorry for the cursing but this is utterly ridiculous.

    You do not treat children this way! It’s inhumane and it shows that you’re nothing but an uneducated and classless and definitely shows how ugly of a person you are.

    This comes down to folks not treating others with kindness and respect. It comes down to folks being insecure of the unknown and not open to the struggles of others.

    I dont have kids but if that was my child….it would have gone down. You can treat me however but not my kid!

    Respect. Home skillet better get some.

    Reply
  7. 7

    Skye M.

    I agree with Amy that we just separate ourselves from those who don’t love me or my son enough to make the effort to understand. Kinda hard to do when it’s family, but in the end you have to do what’s best for you and your child’s physical and emotional health. If they want to, they’ll make an effort. If they don’t, it’s still their decision to separate themselves from you, not yours, so you’re off the hook on guilt as far as I’m concerned.

    Reply
  8. 8

    Diana

    After years of hearing such stupid remarks, I no longer let people get away with it. Most of us are taught not to be rude, but sometimes you just have to answer in kind. You should have asked her if she knows how to cook a hot dog. As you can see when you asked for the brand she couldn’t answer because even she knew it was a stupid thing to say. When I first started on my gluten free diet, my mother and sisters used the “I couldn’t remember what you couldn’t eat so we just made what we like”. I told them that I wouldn’t be back till they figured it out. It didn’t take too long and my not going to anything they were having, for them to read a label and ask a question. If you have to be with your inlaws, make your son some special treats and bring them with you. He will feel special and hopefully your inlaws will wise up.

    Reply
  9. 9

    Carol

    A wise woman once said, “The world is a carousel of a-holes.” Its quoted every single day in my house. Surely, this ranter’s in-laws qualify in spades.

    Reply
  10. 10

    Kate

    WELL I certainly can relate. My son and I are severe Celiacs who don’t consume dairy because we also cannot digest it. At a Christmas party that my grandmother throws and insists I go to (even though we’re Muslim), she fed my son a COOKIE. Within five minutes, he had severe watery diarrhea and became listless, ruining his outfit we had just bought AND scaring me half to death. Needless to say we had to leave early anyway, but before I left, I stood up in front of everyone and scolded her. Yep. I had to scold my 72yr old grandmother. In front of the entire family. And THAT my friends, is how you get a douche to stop being a douche. I was tired of her harming my son all the time and making a mockery of our disease, and if she didn’t care about us and our feelings, she certainly would care what other people thought! Now? She won’t give him anything without asking first ;)

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      The Gluten Dude

      Awesome Kate. Simply awesome.

      Reply
  11. 11

    Miss Dee Meanor

    Ran across this yesterday and thought of things we’ve ranted about in this community. Michael Ruhlman, a chef and judge on the popular show “Iron Chef” interviewed a food blogger who lives with Celiac Disease. It doesn’t encompass everything, but hopefully it is a start to educate chefs on the seriousness of cross-contamination in their kitchen and the realization that this is NOT the latest fad diet. This is the type of media exposure that is needed.

    http://ruhlman.com/2012/07/what-i-didnt-know-about-celiac/

    Any thoughts or comments?

    Reply
    1. 11.1

      The Gluten Dude

      I saw that too Miss Dee. It is a step in the right direction. Thanks for sharing.

      Reply
  12. 12

    MissyMoo

    Whack your sister-in-law in the upside of the head!

    Alternatively, invite everyone around for dinner, make EVERYTHING gluten free and make a show of giving your son a “special plate” with him knowing full well it’s not different to theirs. THEN as they’re leaving be like ‘oh by the way it was all gluten free you freaks’.

    OR just stab them all.

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      Diane Humphrey

      MissyMoo, you crack me up! ;)

      Reply
  13. 13

    Kara

    How about this story.

    My son is 2 1/2 years old and was diagnosed at 18 months with celiac disease, I have it as well. I could rant here for hours about the awful time we had finally getting him a proper diagnosis but I will save that for a later date. What I am dying to rant about today is people who claim they care and take it seriously but really don’t. What I find myself getting most upset about is when my son is made out to be different and straight up left out. My step mom was the first to run out and buy all the gluten free cookbooks and baking books when he was first diagnosed but has she made anything to date, nope. What’s worse is she brought out a tray of GLUTEN FULL goodies for desert after christmas eve supper. My son looks at me and says in his sweet innocent little voice. “I have cookie?” I say, “No sweetie you can’t’ and he says, “Make me sick.” I mean how terrible is that to hear. I am so worried for him having a life of feeling left out by his own family. I try to state how unfair it is to him (I could care less about me not having any, but he’s a kid) but my family says I should think more about family and less about the food. Excuse me but our lives REVOLVE around the food.

    Reply
    1. 13.1

      Donna

      Oh Kara…It sounds like you have one smart little man and you should be very proud of him!!!!!! I am proud and he’s not even MINE!!!!! :) It sucks that we HAVE to go to all the family events and sit there like F-ING lumps while everyone enjoys the delicious gluten filled food!!!!! One of my coworkers actually said to me that if SHE had CD she would eat that donut or cookie anyways!!!! I said, well good for you but I”M not eating it because I KNOW what I’m going to feel like and HOW FREAKING LONG I’m going to feel that way! See…..I”M going off on another rant!!!!! LOL! Good luck with the little man!!!! Sounds like you are doing a great job….keep up the good work!

      Reply
      1. 13.1.1

        Kara

        Thank you so much! Isn’t it the worst when people suggest just a little won’t hurt. Can’t even count how many times I have heard that. I try to make comparisons to other allergies, like would you say that to someone with a peanut allergy? No of course not.
        My reaction to being suggested to just try a little is, “No thanks, it’s not worth me sh*tting my pants.”

        It’s so easy to rant about the stupidity of people who don’t get this allergy. I could scream until I’m blue in the face, and they still wouldn’t get it. Or they would just accuse me of over reacting.

        Reply
        1. 13.1.1.1

          Donna

          You are more than welcome Kara!!! We are here to support one another. If it went the other way I wouldn’t have hesitated to let you know!!!!! :)

          Reply
  14. 14

    Ashley

    The most frustrating comment I have ever heard was to a friend of mine about my 12 year old son. He has Celiac and was going on a trip with a large group and the leader actually said “his mom has him on that fad GF diet, I’m sure we can let him eat pizza with the rest of the group.” My friend thankfully told him it as no fad diet, but very serious! It is so aggravating to have to explain to everyone what celiac is and why he can’t just eat what everyone else is eating!

    Reply
  15. 15

    Emich

    This is so infuriating! Several of my family members have celiac disease, and I have certain dietary restrictions as well, and people’s reactions would lead you to believe that you are committing a mortal sin for preserving your (or your child’s) health. I feel very lucky knowing that if my future kids have food sensitivities, my mom will at least know what’s up. I don’t understand for the life of me why people attach some sort of moral code to what we do or do not eat. In my home, I will always ALWAYS accommodate guests who cannot eat certain foods.

    Reply

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